Lent

Our church follows the calendar of the liturgical year.  Beginning with Advent and progressing through Christmas, Epiphany Season, Lent, Easter Season, and the Season after Pentecost.  These seasons follow the earthly life of Christ as well as his ministry in the world. St. Mary’s is especially blessed to offer special liturgies throughout the liturgical for major feasts and seasons of the church.  Please click on the links below to learn more about our seasonal liturgies.

Lent

In Lent, we journey with Christ through the end of his earthly ministry and his death on Calvary.  Lent calls us to go deeper in our faith. We are called to learn more, to pray more, and to serve others more.  Throughout Lent, worship has a more somber and introspective mood. That usual songs of praise and the shouts of “Alleluia” that are normally a part of the service disappear for a time and are replaced by calls to repentance and amendment of life.  Lent is where we prepare ourselves, together, for a miracle of Easter. Lent is observed with the following special liturgies.

Ash Wednesday
On whatever calendar day it falls, Ash Wednesday is observed at St. Mary’s with three Eucharists at 7:00 AM, 12:00 Noon, and 7:00 PM.  Also included at these liturgies is the imposition of ashes. The ashes, which were created by burning the dried palms from the previous Palm Sunday are used to mark the sign of the cross on the forehead with the words “Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.”  All are then called to the keeping of a holy Lent. Each service on Ash Wednesday is celebrated with music. The 7:00 PM service is a fully choral service.

The Way of the Cross
The Way of the Cross is offered at 5:30 PM every Friday during the Season of Lent.  The devotion known as the Way of the Cross is an adaptation to local usage of a custom widely observed by pilgrims to Jerusalem: the offering of prayer at a series of places in that city traditionally associated withour Lord’s passion and death.  The number of stations, which at first varied widely, finally became fixed at fourteen. Of these, eight are based directly on events recorded in the Gospels. The remaining six (numbers 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, and 13) are based on inferences from the Gospel account or from pious legend.